Questions Answered By Child Custody Attorneys in Centerville OH

Posted by Daniel lawrence on November, 2016

While divorce can be a very difficult situation to face, disputes involving the custody of children can be even more difficult. Emotions tend to run high during these types of proceedings and great care must be taken to ensure the emotional health of the child or children involved. Here are a few of the top questions, with their respective answers, asked of child custody attorneys in Centerville OH.

Q. What factors do courts take into consideration when deciding child custody cases?

A. Many factors come into play during these cases. The attachment that the child has to a particular parent, the stability that the parent will be able to provide, the age of the child (which may affect their decision-making ability), and any history of criminal activity on the part of either parent. All of these factors and more will be considered by the courts as to whom should be given full custody.

Q. What is meant by the term sole custody?

A. Sole custody is defined by most states as the physical and legal custody of the child. This means that most important decisions regarding the child will be determined by the parent who receives sole custody and financial assistance in the form of child support payments will be delivered by the other parent. Visitation rights are usually granted to the parent who does not receive sole custody.

Q. Are mothers automatically granted custody?

A. Not anymore. In the past, this was usually the case. However, with work environments and job situations changing at a rapid pace, the court will generally look at who is able to spend the most quality time with the child while still providing a stable financial home front.

Q. What is meant by the term shared custody?

A. There are two types of shared custody. Joint custody is defined as the parents sharing on an equal basis the raising of a child. The child may even live with parents, for instance, mom during the school year and dad during the summer. Split custody generally refers to situations where there is more than one child and some will live with the mother while the other children will live with their father.

For more answers to questions about child custody, call a reputable firm such as Thorson Switala Mondock & Snead LLP.

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